E.g., 09/16/2014
E.g., 09/16/2014

The Labor Market Integration of New Arrivals in Europe

The Labor Market Integration of New Arrivals in Europe


(RichTea)

​This project evaluates the ease with which foreign-born workers within the European Union are able to establish themselves in destination-country labor markets during the first decade after arrival. The research evaluates the conditions under which new immigrants are able not only to find employment, but also to progress into middle-skilled jobs.

The first phase of the project includes country case studies that consider the influence of individual characteristics and broader economic conditions on the employment prospects of foreign-born workers.

The second phase evaluates the effectiveness of integration and workforce development policies in helping immigrant workers overcome these barriers and move up into middle-skilled positions. The countries studied in this project are the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom.

Recent Activity

Reports
July 2014
By Meghan Benton, Susan Fratzke, and Madeleine Sumption
Reports
May 2014
By Patrick Simon and Elsa Steichen
Reports
April 2014
By Pieter Bevelander and Nahikari Irastorza
Reports
March 2014
By Núria Rodríguez-Planas and Natalia Nollenberger
Reports
July 2014
By Meghan Benton, Susan Fratzke, and Madeleine Sumption
Reports
May 2014
By Patrick Simon and Elsa Steichen
Reports
April 2014
By Pieter Bevelander and Nahikari Irastorza
Reports
March 2014
By Núria Rodríguez-Planas and Natalia Nollenberger

Recent Activity

Reports
July 2014

The global economic crisis and changing migration patterns in Europe bring up questions about how well immigrants are able to find employment and progress into better jobs over time. This overview report caps a series of six country case studies evaluating the employment outcomes for foreign-born workers during their first decade in the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom.

Reports
June 2014

This report analyzes the labor market integration of newcomers to Germany, who tend to have different national origins and higher levels of education than earlier waves of migrants. These new immigrants have had varying levels of success in finding employment and transitioning into higher-skilled jobs.

Reports
May 2014

This report analyzes the labor market integration of recent immigrants to the United Kingdom. During the 2000s, a large influx of labor from Eastern European countries transformed the United Kingdom's immigrant population and labor market. The report finds that over time, these new arrivals showed some progress in moving out of the lowest-skilled jobs.

Reports
May 2014

This report analyzes how recent immigrants to France fare in the country's labor market over time. The research shows that new arrivals initially face a hostile labor market and ultimately improve their employment outcomes—but their process of labor market insertion and advancement is a slow one.

Reports
April 2014

Many of Sweden's immigrants are refugees who lack the skills and education to gain employment soon after they arrive. Over time, however, newcomers to Sweden have improved their employment rates, displayed income growth similar to natives, and moved from low- to middle-skilled positions. This report assesses how new immigrants—refugees, labor migrants, and others—fare in Sweden's labor market.

Reports
March 2014

This report assesses how new immigrants to Spain fare in the country's labor market, evaluating the conditions under which they are able to find employment, and their progress out of unskilled work into middle-skilled jobs. The report is part of a series of six case studies on labor market outcomes among immigrants to European Union countries.

Reports
March 2014

This report assesses the labor market outcomes of new immigrants in the Czech Republic, focusing on trends according to year of arrival, country of origin, gender, level of education, and sector of employment. The analysis suggests that the challenge of reducing obstacles to immigrant workers’ progression into more skilled employment are worth significant policy attention.