E.g., 11/28/2014
E.g., 11/28/2014

MPI-EUI Project

MPI-EUI Project

A Global Project on Improving the Capacity for Responding to Global Challenges

 
This project identified ways in which European and U.S. immigration systems can be substantially improved to address major challenges policymakers confront on both sides of the Atlantic, in the context of the current economic turmoil and in the longer term.
 
The project was funded by the European Union and directed at the Migration Policy Institute by MPI President Demetrios Papademetriou and at the European University Institute’s Migration Policy Center at the Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, by Philippe Fargues, the center’s director. Read the final report here.
 
The research focuses on eight challenges policymakers face in the United States and Europe (view focus areas at right).

Recent Activity

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Recent Activity

Reports
May 2011

The U.S. refugee protection system, while generous in many respects, has become less robust over the last two decades. The unique and often diverse needs of emerging refugee populations have exposed severe limitations in the standard resettlement approach.This report examines U.S. legal and policy responses to those seeking protection and addresses the barriers, gaps, and opportunities that exist.

Reports
May 2011

Immigration is a prominent part of the United States’ DNA, despite concerns about immigrants’ ability to integrate. An examination of recent immigrant inflows shows newcomers to the United States are integrating well, based on language proficiency, socioeconomic attainment, political participation, residential locale, and social interaction indicators.

Reports
April 2011

Noncoercive, pay-to-go, voluntary, assisted voluntary, and nonforced returns generally can offer paid travel and/or other financial incentive to encourage unauthorized immigrants to cooperate with immigration officials and leave host countries. A look at three key rationales for governments to choose pay-to-go and other returns.

Reports
April 2011

Migrant-sending and migrant-receiving countries rarely collaborate on migration issues because the structure of global migration systems ensures they often disagree about core policy issues. This report shows that migration collaboration makes sense when states share common goals they cannot achieve on their own.

Reports
March 2011

This report details the post-9/11 programs and agreements implemented by U.S. and European governments to identify terrorists and serious transnational criminals through the collection and processing of increasing quantities of traveler data.

Reports
February 2011

Faced with enormous political pressure to stop illegal immigration and to prevent the entry of potential terrorists, the U.S. government has devoted ever more resources to enforcing border policies. It remains unclear, the author argues, whether the efficacy of these programs warrants their costs.

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