E.g., 11/01/2014
E.g., 11/01/2014

A Grand Bargain: Balancing the National Security, Economic, and Immigration Interests of the U.S. and Mexico

Fact Sheets
April 2002

A Grand Bargain: Balancing the National Security, Economic, and Immigration Interests of the U.S. and Mexico

This policy paper calls for a "Grand Bargain" between the United States and Mexico to address the areas of immigration and national security. Such a bargain would address the conflicting realities of the U.S.-Mexico relationship. The bargain would be composed of three completely integrated programs and two additional areas that need to be adressed. This three-(plus two)-pronged approach would realistically address the most vexing problems in the bilateral relationship, and deliver to both sides the outcomes they most urgently desire.

The programs called for include a registration program followed by an earned regularization program, a broad temporary worker program, and new border security arrangements. In addition, the bargain would allow Mexican immigrants to reunify with their closest family members on an expedited basis, and would include working with Mexico to target high out-migration areas for social infrastructure and economic development initiatives. 

The policy paper urges the U.S. and Mexican presidents, when they meet in Monterrey, Mexico on March 22, 2002, to announce they are restarting bilateral negotiations, and to direct their negotiators to create a detailed plan of action, within six months, which addresses all four priorities.

Table of Contents 

I. Introduction

II. National Security

III. Economic and Program Administration Issues

IV. Political and Practical Considerations

V. Thinking Further Ahead

VI. Conclusion